Waivers Continue to be Granted

The New York Times recently published an article concerning the No Child Left Behind waivers that are being granted to states. With increasing cries for help, Obama has continued to grant additional waivers to states who have applied for them, realizing the unrealistic goals of NCLB. NY Times journalist, Motoko Rich, exposes the latest in […]

The New York Times recently published an article concerning the No Child Left Behind waivers that are being granted to states. With increasing cries for help, Obama has continued to grant additional waivers to states who have applied for them, realizing the unrealistic goals of NCLB. NY Times journalist, Motoko Rich, exposes the latest in his article, “‘No Child’ Law Whittled Down by White House”.

“While No Child Left Behind has been praised for forcing schools to become more accountable for the education of poor and minority children, it has been derided for what some regard as an obsessive focus on test results, which has led to some notorious cheating scandals. Critics have also faulted the law’s system of rating schools, which they say labeled so many of them low performing that it rendered the judgment meaningless.”

“In exchange for the education waivers, schools and districts must promise to set new targets aimed at preparing students for colleges and careers. They must also tether evaluations of teachers and schools in part to student achievement on standardized tests. The use of tests to judge teacher effectiveness is a departure from No Child Left Behind, which used test scores to rate schools and districts.”

Education officials express relief from the waivers of the No Child Left Behind act. Many educators say the goals that were in place were unrealistic and unattainable in most cases. The pressure schools felt from the approaching 2014 deadline was putting stress on the educators, and none were too happy about it.

“Across the country, nearly half of all schools missed their targets under No Child Left Behind in the 2010-11 school year.”

“In some states, the rate was much higher. In Massachusetts, for example, 80 percent of schools did not make adequate progress during that school year, and in Virginia, the figure was 61 percent.”

To hear additional statistics in support of granting waivers, read the entire article in The New York Times.


Published July 16, 2012